SEIRI Hosted Talks and Workshops

Geraldine Richmond

University of Oregon, Presidential Chair in Science and Professor Chemistry
Title: The Art of Effective Negotiation
November 22, 2019

Geraldine Richmond
Geraldine Richmond

Negotiations occur every day in the scientific laboratory and workplace and often involve issues that are key to research success and career advancement. This workshop teaches the fundamentals of negotiation relevant to a variety of one-on-one conversations and group settings. Topics include the importance of negotiation to advance research and career objectives, identification of negotiables for research, teaching and career advancement, elements of a successful negotiation, the importance of developing alternatives to an agreement, techniques for handling difficult people and conversations, the importance of listening and appreciating different viewpoints and identification of short and long-term negotiation goals.

The Art of Effective Negotiation

NSF Workshop

November 4, 2019

NSF logo
National Science Foundation

NSF Program directors form the Division of Undergraduate Education at the NSF lead an interactive workshop discussing evaluation and research, Broader Impacts and Intellectual Merit, CAREER, IUSE, NOYCE and S-STEM grant programs. The activities included a mock review panel, and NSF Awardees panel, and individual appointments with the directors.

2019 NSF Workshop

LSMRCE Conference Results - Building a Diverse STEM Talent Pool: Classrooms to Careers

2019 LSMRCE Conference
2019 LSMRCE Conference

The Louis Stokes Midwest Regional Center of Excellence (LSMRCE) and the Indiana STEM Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (IN LSAMP) co-hosted the 2019 LSMRCE conference titled "Building a Diverse STEM Talent Pool: Classroom to Careers" in Indianapolis on October 25–27, 2019. The conference brought together 567 educators, students, community/government leaders from 31 states to present and learn about the impacts of the LSAMP program to increase the participation and degree attainment of underrepresented minority students in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

Dr. Karen Allen Keene

Dr. Karen Allen Keene
Dr. Karen Allen Keene

Dr. Karen Allen Keene is a Program Director in NSF’s Division of Undergraduate Education and an Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at North Carolina State University. She is currently in her third year at the National Science Foundation where she serves as a Program Officer in several programs, including Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE), the Robert Noyce Teachers Program, Scholarships for STEM students (S-STEM) and EHR Core Research (ERC). Karen has taught high school mathematics in public and private schools in Indiana, served as an instructor at Saint Mary’s College, Valparaiso University and Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities.

Dr. Steve Turley

Dr. Steve Turley
Dr. Steve Turley

Dr. Steve Turley received a B.S. in physics from Brigham Young University and a PhD in physics from the Massachusetts Institution of Technology. After graduating from MIT, Dr. Turley worked for 11 years at the Hughes Aircraft Company Research Labs in Malibu, California. He then spent 23 years at Brigham Young University where he has been a Professor of Physics, Department Chair, and Associate Dean. He has been a temporary Program Officer in the Division of Undergraduate Education at the National Science Foundation since the beginning of 2018.

Dr. Stephanie E. August

Dr. Stephanie E. August
Dr. Stephanie E. August

Dr. Stephanie E. August is a Program Director in NSF’s Division of Undergraduate Education and a professor of computer science at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. She is an active member of the working group for the Future of Work at the Human Technology Frontier. She has served as department director of graduate studies and special assistant to the chief academic officer for graduate studies at LMU. Stephanie is interested in the online interactive and virtual learning environments, infusing other disciplines with computing concepts, and understanding how STEM education will evolve in the coming years.

James Pellegrino

University of Illinois at Chicago
Liberal Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor and Distinguished Professor of Education
Title: Education R, D &I – Why Evaluation Matters and How to Make it Effective
October 15, 2019

James Pellegrino
James Pellegrino

In STEM education, and other areas, it is not uncommon for faculty to focus their attention on research, development, and implementation. Often concerns regarding evaluation of the efficacy and impact of what we have proposed to do is left ambiguous and for a later time, and falling on the shoulders of someone else. In this presentation we will look at the values of thinking about evaluation at the start of a project rather than towards the end. The focus will be on framing evaluation issues and designs in the context of uncovering and specifying our “theories of action” and structuring our assumptions in terms of logic models. The values of doing so will be illustrated for designing and instrumenting both formative and summative evaluation activities.

James Pellegrino presentation

Diane M. Bunce

Professor Emerita, Department of Chemistry
The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC
Title: Investigating Classroom Myths Through Learning Research on Teaching and Learning
October 24, 2018

Diane M. Bunce
Diane M. Bunce

Myths arise as a way to explain the reality we experience. In the teaching of chemistry, two myths that exist are concerned with how long students can pay attention in lecture or why C students don’t succeed at a high level. As scientists we know that the best way to explain something is through investigation. The same is true with understanding student learning and the associated student behaviors that we see in undergraduate chemistry courses. This talk presented research which was published in the learning of chemistry that challenged the prevailing myths of why students experience difficulty in undergraduate chemistry coursed including how long they can pay attention in lecture and what can be done to influence their attention span as well as look at how C students study and subsequently solve problems that result in uneven success in chemistry.

Isiah Warner

Vice President for Strategic Initiatives, Boyd Professor and Philip W. West Professor Analytical and Environmental Chemistry
Louisiana State University
Title: Reflections on STEM Programs within the Office of Strategic Initiatives
March 28, 2018

Isiah Warner
Isiah Warner

In the United States, less than half of the students who enter into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) undergraduate programs as freshmen will graduate with a STEM degree. On this basis, there is a clear need for innovative initiatives that promote undergraduate retention and achievement within STEM. The LSU Office of Strategic Initiatives (OSI) has developed a stable of such initiatives. Principle among these is the Louisiana Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (LA-STEM) Research Scholars Program, which has developed into a model program for increasing persistence and achievement within the STEM disciplines.

Erin Dolan

Professor, Georgia Athletic Association Professor of Innovative Science Education
University of Georgia
Title: Engaging Undergraduates in Research at Scale: What if the treatment is a CURE?
November 17, 2017

Erin Dolan
Erin Dolan

National calls to improve undergraduate STEM education have emphasized the importance of undergraduate research experiences. Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences, or CUREs, involve groups of students in addressing research problems or question in the context of a class, and have been proposed as scalable ways of involving undergraduates in research. This seminar will offer a definition of CUREs, describe what makes them distinctive from other learning experiences, outline the state of knowledge about CURE effectiveness, and highlight results from a study of the Freshman Research Initiative as a unique and highly impactful CURE model.

Ann Austin

Mildred B. Erickson distinguished Chair in Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education
Michigan State University
Title: Strategies for Increasing Involvement of Women Scholars in STEM Field: Lessons from ADVANCE Institutions
October 23, 2017

Ann Austin
Ann Austin

What strategies have been used in universities across the country to create institutional environments that encourage the success of women scholars? Which strategies work most effectively, and why? Leading organizational change in higher education to create more inclusive environments and to support a more diverse faculty requires strategic choices about appropriate levers for change that are effective in complex organizations. Building on the presenter’s extensive research across more than 25 universities that have had NSF ADVANCE Institutional Transformation grants focused on improving the recruitment, retention, and success of women faculty in STEM fields, this session will: (1) highlight key findings from research, supported by the National Science Foundation, on organizational change strategies to create institutional environments conducive to the success of women scholars, particularly in STEM fields; (2) introduce a new, practical, research-based resource called the StratEGIC Toolkit (www.strategictoolkit.org), which highlights and analyzes thirteen frequently used strategic interventions that contribute to the recruitment, retention, and success of a diverse faculty; and (3) enable university change leaders, including Deans, Department Chairs, and FEAs, to discuss strategic options as they compile portfolios of organizational change interventions that are responsive to their particular contexts. The strategies discussed will include, among others, mentoring and networking activities, inclusive recruitment and hiring approaches, grants to individual faculty members, strategies for improving departmental climate, and strategies for enhancing the visibility of women scholars.

NSF Workshop

Program Officer, Ron Buckmire
October 27, 2016

Ron Buckmire
Ron Buckmire

Ron Buckmire will present and lead an interactive discussion on ways to improve proposal grant writing abilities and achieve the best possible results when applying to the NSF DUE/EHR programs.

Ron Buckmire is the Lead Program Director of the Scholarship for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (S-STEM) program housed in the Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Before coming to NSF in May 2016 as a permanent program director responsible for mathematics education, he had served as a rotator (temporary Program Director) in DUE from 2011-2013. He has been a faculty member at Occidental College in Los Angeles for 22 years, serving as chair of the Mathematics department (2005-2010, 2015-2016) and achieving the rank of Full Professor in 2014 after starting as a Minority Postdoctoral Scholar-in-Residence.

STEM Education Innovation and Research Institute
IUPUI
Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research
755 W. Michigan Street
University Library, UL 1123
Indianapolis, IN 46202-2800
Tel:317-278-0168
Email: seiri@iupui.edu
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